The Lost Art of Personal Responsibility

I try to do light posts, I really do. It seems as though when my blog day rolls around I’m in the midst of some drama that I can’t shake and I end up writing about it here on the blog. So I apologize for being Debbie Downer.

I’ve become very discouraged by society’s lack of personal responsibility. Sometimes when things go wrong, the first place we should look for blame is in the mirror. Lately, however, this is the last place anyone looks when searching for answers.

Accidents happen. I get that. People make mistakes. I’m the queen of making mistakes. This isn’t a dig on people being human, but when mistakes are made—either intentional or unintentional—it sure would be great to hear someone (anyone!) take responsibility.

This rant covers all of us: from our politicians to our leaders in all walks of life to parents and to children. Taking responsibility for our actions used to be expected. It used to be applauded by society. Now, it’s a dying art, a wistful yearning for the olden days. I, for one, wish it would make a resurgence. We’d all be better off.

Okay, I’m off my high horse and I actually feel better, even though I’ve depressed our readers (sorry). Obviously, when I’m feeling down, writing out my issues makes me feel better. What about you? How do you cope when life lets you down?

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About Christy Hayes

A wife, a mother and a writer of romantic women's fiction. I love dogs, exercise and cable news.

Posted on April 2, 2012, in Blog Posts. Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. Totally agree with you on loss of personal responsibility. Always bothers me when people shrug off their commitments as though they don’t matter. They do.

    What do I do? I walk. I organize. I turn inward and focus on what I can do to help the situation and then help others do the same.

    • Walking and exercising is a great way to burn off the frustration and really think through the problem. Thanks for reminding me of this, Dianne.

  2. Christy, this is the best way to cope with those “downer” moments. Not just to share but to unleash the beast. It is the old adage of “pass the buck,” and once upon a time there was a man who said “the buck stops here.” It seems his words have been forgotten and that lousy buck keeps passing through the hands of those who need to stop for a moment and think how their actions have affected so many. Don’t feel too depressed. There is one thing we can count on in life … while all things remains the same, everything changes.

    • It does help to know I’m not alone in dealing with this kind of frustration. Thanks, Florence. You are right, everything changes.

  3. I love it when people write how they’re feeling. For me, that’s when I enjoy posts the best, so thanks for “sharing”. My son is famous for “passing the buck” and I try so hard to show him that the buck stops exactly where HE is. People should feel proud when they take responsibility for their actions, whether they’re good or bad. They can accept the compliment or say they’re sorry for their wrongdoing, but own up to it and “be a woman”, so to speak.
    Thanks for the post.
    Patti

  4. A woman charged behind my car as I inched backward from my space yesterday. I had to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting her. She glared at me and threw up her hands. She’d seen me backing up and walked behind my car knowing I couldn’t see her, blaming me for her near-tragedy. I try really hard to do right, but I often feel sabotaged in my efforts when others don’t do the same.

  5. A woman charged behind my car as I inched backward from my space yesterday. I had to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting her. She glared at me and threw up her hands. She’d seen me backing up and walked behind my car knowing I couldn’t see her, blaming me for her near-tragedy. I try really hard to do right, but I often feel sabotaged in my efforts when others don’t do the same.

  6. The stresses of everyday life can easily get us down. Writing about it helps for those of us with the writing bug. It’s better than eating!

    I agree that we as a society have chosen to shirk taking responsibility for our actions. Sadly, I’ve witnessed this first hand in a pretty devastating way these past two years. But, I haven’t lost faith. I try to do something random and nice for someone every day–even if it’s just picking up a piece of trash left on the sidewalk. I love that insurance commercial where one person does a random act of kindness and it impacts another person to do the same. I can only hope more of us will follow this trend.

    Thanks for the gentle reminder!

    • I like that commercial also because it is so true. The more people act responsibly, the more it will once again become the expected norm.

  7. Susan’s comment reminded me of all the times I’ve been driving down the road and someone steps onto the street to cross it without even checking to see if a vehicle is approaching. I always wonder what they’re thinking. Do they not understand that vehicles are tougher than they are? What happens if they’re hit? Who’s at fault? And where do you think they’re going to put the blame? It doesn’t matter that they didn’t bother to look. It only matters to them that they were hit. Sheesh.

    It’s so easy to put the blame on someone else’s back, but you’re so right, Christy. People need to accept responsibilty for their own actions … and sometimes for the actions of those around them. 🙂

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