It’s Hard Having Children & An Excerpt!

You’d think it would stop after the labor pains, or perhaps the teenage years, but I’ve discovered that no matter how old your children are, you always worry about them.

My youngest son’s hobby is restoring heavy duty equipment. Recently, while loading some caterpillar tracks to recycle at the local scrap yard, the tracks shifted and caught his index finger, tearing off the fingernail and a chunk of the end of his finger. And while it has healed nicely, I’ve still not recovered from the incident.

My Dad taking a spin on his grandson's cat.

My Dad taking a spin on his grandson’s cat.

 

I worry, probably needlessly, but I’m his mother, and all I want is for my boys to be healthy and happy and unhurt.

The hero in my contemporary romance, Always Remember, worries about his daughter, too. The single dad of a 17 year old girl, he’s raised her the best he could, and still…

(Excerpt from Always RememberAfter getting bucked off his horse, the heroine is giving Nate Coltrane a lower back massage when they’re interrupted by his daughter Sara…)

“Dad?”

Along with the sound of her boots tromping across the floor, approaching the entryway, he caught the strain in her voice.

“I—oh, excuse me. I didn’t know you were busy.”

Nate raised his head from his folded arms. “Come on in. Jess was just giving me a massage, trying to fix my sore back.”

Right, and another two minutes, you would have been fixing her.

As if she’d heard his thoughts, Jessie scrambled off him, landed on her rear end, then leapt to her feet. Nate shifted slightly, enough to notice the flush that darkened her cheeks.

“We were finished anyway,” she explained in a breathless rush. “And I was just leaving.”

Always Remember by Sheila SeabrookRight about now, Nate wished he could leave with her. As she ran from the room, the humor of the situation hit him. They’d been caught like two randy teenagers, only it was the daughter, not the parents, terminating their foreplay. Now, how did he go about hiding his aroused state from his perceptive daughter?

“So what’s up, squirt?” Other than me. Nonchalant, pretend like nothing out of the ordinary had happened. Like his world hadn’t shifted and tilted for the second time since Jessie’s arrival.

Sara snatched the pile of mail from the coffee table and slid onto the floor beside him. “You didn’t tell me you hurt your back. Diablo? You know, I’ve been thinking. Maybe you need professional help.”

“You mean a shrink?” He reached out and ruffled her hair. Thanks to Jessie, his back did feel better, but now he had another ache he wished she’d stuck around to cure. Suddenly, the floor felt hard and uncomfortable. “Sara, Diablo and I have an agreement.”

“Yeah, yeah, yeah. Sometimes I think I should’ve been in charge of you instead of the other way around.” She ducked out from under his hand and looked him square in the eye. “You realize, of course, that what you two were doing in here was totally unacceptable.”

Laughter burst from his chest.

“Well, I’m not a kid anymore. I’ve been trying to tell you that for years.”

No, she wasn’t a kid. She’d grown into a beautiful young woman, as mature and self-reliant as her mother. How had he gotten so lucky? She’d never given him a lick of trouble, not the way Jessie and him had tested their parents’ patience.

Sara sorted listlessly through the envelopes, tossing the bills aside before spreading her favorite magazine on the floor between them. Nate noted the pallor of her cheeks, the bluish smudges beneath her eyes. He wanted to ask her what was wrong, but feared the question would send her running up to her bedroom like last time.

Better that he be patient and wait for her to come to him. When she was ready to talk, she’d do it in her own good time.

He bumped her on the shoulder. “What are you reading?”

(End of excerpt)

So what kind of unfun and worrisome things have your children done? And how long did it take you to recover from the incident?

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About Sheila Seabrook

Author of Single Title Romantic Comedy and Women's Fiction

Posted on June 18, 2014, in Blog Posts and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. It never ends, does it? My son is home this summer for the first time since he left for college. What I don’t know about while they’re away at school, I can’t worry about. But when they’re home–or not home until 2 am–I worry!

    • I know exactly what you’re talking about, Tracy. Our oldest lives in the city, so we usually don’t find out what’s going on until after-the-fact. But because our youngest is a home, there’s no being left in the dark.

      We spent the day in the emergency room again today.

  2. Just like Tracy, if they’re at home, then you know when they’re not there and wonder where they are and if they’re going to come back safe. My son’s still home so I am constantly on alert and each morning I have to get the dog out of his bedroom so I am relieved he’s in his bed. It never stops, though.

  3. I worry about everything! My oldest is driving now and the worry with that never ends. Youngest is attached 24/7 to her phone and I worry about that.

    I hope your son is better. What a fascinating hobby!

  4. Sheila, having survived the teen years and gone through marriage and grandchildren with two of them, I can safely say that it is never over. You worry about everything. My mom once told me “Little children, little problems. Big children, big problems.”

    It is the only job we have for a life time 🙂 Hope you son stays safe and give you less to worry over.

    • You mom was right, Florence. But thankfully, when the worrisome stuff is out of the way and in the past, we’re so fortunate to have our kids, aren’t we? 🙂

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